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Apple iphone 6 – SIM FREE 4.7 Inch Display Mobile Phone Unlocked To All Networks (16GB, SPACE GREY) – Sale Item – 16 GB Mobile Sale

Apple iphone 6 - SIM FREE 4.7 Inch Display Mobile Phone Unlocked To All Networks (16GB, SPACE GREY)

  • Apple iphone 6 – SIM FREE 4.7 Inch Display Mobile Phone Unlocked To All Networks (16GB, SPACE GREY)

BRAND NEW SEALED IPHONE 6 4.7 16GB SPACE GREY MG472B/A FACTORY UNLOCKED UK MODEL A1586 WITH ONE YEAR APPLE STORE WARRANTY



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Jumper EZpad 5S – TechRadar

Microsoft’s Surface 3 was, at least in the subdued PC market, a relative success, selling well despite a rather steep price point for what it provides hardware-wise (something we criticised1). At nearly 500 (£690 in the US, which is around AU£920) when you factor in the detachable keyboard and the stylus, it comes across as an expensive tablet even by Microsoft’s standards, especially as the competition has heated up in the 2-in-1 segment. So it comes as no surprise that, just like the MacBook Pro2 and the Yoga 3 (both of which had very similar competitors in the shape of the Xiaomi Air 123 and the Voyo VBook V34), the Surface 3 has attracted the attention of one Chinese vendor, Jumper.

The latter has unleashed the EZpad 5S, a Windows tablet with a detachable keyboard which is remarkably similar to the Surface 3.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

Gearbest sent us a review unit the device5 is currently on sale for just under 185 (£238, which is around AU£320) with the keyboard. Oddly, the model we received doesn’t look like the one that’s displayed on Gearbest’s product page the card reader is located on the side rather than under the kickstand, and there’s one microUSB port in lieu of a full-size USB 2.0. We strongly advise you to read our article on the pros and cons of buying from Chinese retailers6 (and generally speaking, outside of the UK).

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The Jumper EZpad 5S comes with the detachable keyboard, standard charger, a USB cable, and surprise, surprise, a stylus. Funnily enough, there’s no mention of the latter on the product page and it didn’t work when we tried it. You don’t need yet another charger as you can charge this tablet from pretty much any existing USB-equipped device and charger; and yes, that even includes portable battery packs.

The biggest difference between this slate and Microsoft’s effort is the aspect ratio of the display. To put it simply, the EZpad 5S looks like a stretched Surface 3, but other than this the differences between the two are relatively small.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The rather thick black bezel is there with the silver border and the slightly tapered edges. The physical Windows home button has been moved but the metal kickstand which locks in two positions (about 40- and 85-degrees) is present. The tablet’s enclosure is entirely made of brushed aluminium; Jumper says that it is as strong as stainless steel but a third lighter. From afar though, it looks like plastic painted to resemble, well, brushed aluminium.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The glass display is glossy and as expected, is a major fingerprint magnet, but that’s an endemic problem for (most) entry-level tablets in general. Microsoft used an Atom x7-Z8700 CPU for the Surface 3; Jumper opted for a much slower (and cheaper) x3-Z8300 processor instead.

The main differences between the two are the base frequencies (1.44GHz vs 1.6GHz), the burst frequencies (1.84GHz vs 2.4GHz) and the graphics units’ burst frequencies (500MHz vs 600MHz). Open the device up and you will see 4GB of RAM and 64GB on-board storage (eMMC) plus a large 8500mAh battery.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The EZpad 5S has a larger 11.6-inch display compared to Surface 3’s 10.8-inch screen, which translates into a lower pixel density, but that won’t mean much if you plan to use it mostly with a keyboard. The rest of the specification includes rear and front cameras (5MP and full HD respectively), Bluetooth 4.0 and 802.11n Wi-Fi, and on both sides, a mini-HDMI port, a pair of speakers, a headphone jack, an SD card slot, one USB 2.0 port, one USB 3.0 port and a microUSB one.

The power button and volume rocker can be found on the top, while the magnetic connector for the keyboard is located at the opposite end.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The keyboard cover adds some significant thickness to the keyboard but is a welcome addition. The tablet measures 276 x 172 x 8mm and weighs 676g, and the keyboard increases the overall weight by another 50%, to just over 1kg. Despite being a passive keyboard, it worked quite well, and is probably the best keyboard typing experience we’ve had on a cover-type model from any vendor and that includes the likes of Microsoft. Sure, it is a tad small and should ideally have taken the whole width of the cover, but it has a decent size touchpad, and the fact that it is rather thick (9mm) means there is at least some travel and spring.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

Don’t expect miracles though the keys are tiny so will require some adjustment for touch typing, especially as there’s barely any space between them. Fat-fingered typists will probably have a worse typing experience, predictably enough. The touchpad is smaller than a credit card but produces a useful click when pressed harder, and it’s precise.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The IPS display, although sharp, lacked the punch usually associated with brighter monitors. We also noted that blacks were lacking and that wasn’t helped by the glare caused by the glass overlay, which added what looks like a layer of smog, even when we pushed the brightness setting to 100%. Having a metal body is useful to dissipate heat as the EZpad 5S doesn’t have an active fan, but it still got fairly hot in our tests. General performance was, as expected, significantly worse than most of the products we test here.

And the main culprits are the processor and the storage subsystem. We tested the Jumper tablet with Passmark, CPU-Z, GeekBench and Cinebench; unfortunately, CrystalDiskMark wouldn’t run. You can see the results below.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

We didn’t extensively test its battery life but we managed to play a YouTube video for about 3 hours 5 minutes on maximum brightness bear in mind that the battery saving mode kicked in on 20% battery life. That’s a decent result but a far cry from the Surface 3. You won’t buy the EZpad for its audio performance; the pair of speakers on this tablet is one of the worst we’ve encountered. The rendition of Alicia Keys phenomenal New York was appalling to say the least. All the ingredients for even an average audio experience were missing: there was barely any depth, a lack of definition, and muddled sound at higher frequencies. You could easily mistake this cacophony for the sound coming out of a pair of cheap smartphone earbuds.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

And as with most of the Chinese devices we’ve tested up until now, the Windows 10 operating system has already been pre-registered, and ours even came with a Chinese version of WinRAR.

Early verdict

The Jumper EZpad is a better-than-average product with not much to be criticised concerning its performance or build. Sure, the battery life is poor and the speakers are terrible, but that’s about all on the moaning front. However, as with most products that ship directly from China, we have more than a few reservations, such as the OS installation and, as we mentioned before, be sure to check out our guide7 to online Chinese retailers. The truth of the matter is, though, that the competition outside the Surface 3 is, well, almost non-existent. The Acer Aspire Switch 11 V8 may have a much faster CPU but it also costs around twice the price. Ditto for the HP Pavilion x29 which is actually even more expensive (while having a better CPU and quadruple the storage).

As such the EZpad 5S almost wins by default sadly, none of the big players (Dell, Lenovo and HP) have anything even remotely competitive.

References

  1. ^ something we criticised (www.techradar.com)
  2. ^ MacBook Pro (www.techradar.com)
  3. ^ Xiaomi Air 12 (www.techradar.com)
  4. ^ Voyo VBook V3 (www.techradar.com)
  5. ^ device (www.gearbest.com)
  6. ^ pros and cons of buying from Chinese retailers (www.techradar.com)
  7. ^ guide (www.techradar.com)
  8. ^ Aspire Switch 11 V (www.techradar.com)
  9. ^ HP Pavilion x2 (www.techradar.com)

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

Launched at the beginning of 2016, the Lifebook S9361 sits, together with the U904, in a category that Fujitsu describes as notebooks with “ultimate features and stylish design”, destined for professionals on the move looking for products that combine looks with substance. Prosaically though, it’s essentially a more refined version of the Lifebook E7362 that we reviewed not so long ago. As expected from a laptop for which the cheapest version will set you back about 1,000 (around £1,340, AU£1,740), this is a model that looks and feels premium. Its main rivals include the ThinkPad T460s series, the Dell Latitude E7440 and the HP Elitebook 1040 G3.

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

The S936 uses the same magnesium/aluminium combination for its chassis but manages to keep the weight down to only 1.19kg (our model weighed in at 1.42kg thanks to an optical drive and the touch display). What came as a surprise though was how chunky it is at its thickest, this notebook is a whopping 26mm thick, which pushes it outside the minimum requirements to be called an Ultrabook. At last, a vendor that doesn’t compromise! Another area where Fujitsu has trumped the competition is connectivity and expansion capabilities.

Unlike many of its competitors and despite its weight, Fujitsu managed to include a free memory slot that allows the owner to upgrade the memory to 20GB of DDR4 RAM (4GB of memory is soldered on the motherboard) simply by removing one screw and one flap. This is still a far cry from the 32GB that the E736 could take thanks to two free slots, but it is the only major step down with this model. We’re puzzled by the fact that engineers have managed to cram in a modular bay that allows you to shove in a secondary battery, a hard drive or an optical drive; an example of where modularity works in an enterprise setup.

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

When it comes to ports, there’s a GbE port, a legacy VGA one, and HDMI port, three USB 3.0, an audio connector and a card reader. It’s a shame about the lack of a DisplayPort though which would have made this machine 4K friendly.

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

Servicing the laptop is a fairly mundane operation. There are a dozen screws that need to be removed some of which are well hidden and all the important components are well in sight. Because Fujitsu placed manageability ahead of integration, servicing teams will be able to replace almost all components in the S936 far faster, in case of hardware issues, reducing downtime considerably.

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

However, we did hit a snag when trying to take out the battery. For some reason, the S936 includes a snap-on cover, an odd option. When we tried to put the battery back, it just wouldn’t fit in properly and got jammed. This meant that we couldn’t put the cover back on. Speaking of the battery, the smaller one offered has a 51Whr capacity with a beefier 6-cell model boasting 77Whr and up to 15 hours of longevity. Slot in an optional secondary 28Whr battery and that adds another six hours to an already impressive battery life.

The battery life tests were carried out by Fujitsu using the BAPco MobileMark 2014 office productivity test. A major reason why the S936 excels in mobility is because it uses a screen technology that draws less power.

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

Our model came with a palm vein sensor, a Fujitsu exclusive and one that doesn’t require you to touch the sensor in order to unlock your device. A more traditional fingerprint sensor is also available as an option. Other security features on the S936 include a smart card reader, encrypted disk and a TPM 2.0 module, all of which are staple offerings on high-end enterprise laptops. The relatively small footprint of the machine means that a 13.3-inch display was the only logical choice with a full HD model or a WQHD one, with touch and anti-glare offered as options.

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

Our model came with an Intel Core i7-6600U CPU (2.6GHz, two cores, 4MB cache), 8GB of RAM, a 128GB M2 SSD, a 4G LTE modem, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.1, NFC, Windows 10 Pro and a list price of 1,200 (around £1,600, AU£2,090) excluding VAT. As with other Fujitsu laptops, this one comes with a two-year warranty. There are also two front-facing speakers and a webcam. We tested the Fujitsu Lifebook S936 using Cinebench R15, CPU-Z and GeekBench 4. On the first benchmark, it reached 43.9 fps for the OpenGL test and 322 points for the CPU benchmark. CPU-Z yielded scores of 1,597 and 3,597 (Single and Multi-thread respectively) while on the newly introduced GeekBench 4, the notebook achieved 17,749 on its compute benchmark and 3,871/7,560 points on its single/multi-core test.

All these numbers are on par with what one would expect from a Skylake-based Core i7 processor from Intel.

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

The display, which uses Sharp’s acclaimed IGZO technology, was exquisite, on par with the rest of the competition. It boasts great viewing angles, reasonably thin bezels and well balanced colours. The keyboard and the touchpad were equally good the former offers a reasonable spring and feedback, with massive Enter, Shift and Backspace keys, and great travel. The touchpad has two physical mouse buttons and while it’s not the biggest we’ve seen on a 13.3-inch laptop, it is accurate and responsive, although we have some reservations regarding its slightly high level of friction.

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

A port replicator/docking station is also available which adds an extra USB 3.0 port, DVI and DisplayPort connectors.

Fujitsu Lifebook S936

Early verdict

The Lifebook S936 is one of the best designed laptops we’ve seen in recent years. Okay, so it’s not perfect and is a tad thicker than we’d expect, but removing the artificial limit on thickness gave more leeway to engineers and frankly, the additional 10mm thickness meant more space to fiddle around and a level of expansion capabilities that we’ve never seen on any laptop of this weight.

Perhaps the only reservation we have is about the battery and its cover; a minor point but one that caused us some problems.

References

  1. ^ Lifebook S936 (www.techradar.com)
  2. ^ Lifebook E736 (www.techradar.com)

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