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‘Policeman car attack footage’ probed by Scotland Yard

Dramatic footage which appears to show a policeman attacking a car after the driver refuses to get out will be investigated, Scotland Yard said. The clip, shared on social media on Saturday and viewed around 50,000 times, shows what appears to be a police officer – filmed from the position of the driver – repeatedly telling him to “get out of the car”, adding: “You’re not allowed to drive it.”

The officer then hits the driver’s side window with what looks like a baton, before a voice can be heard saying: “I’ve got a licence. I’ve got a licence. I’ve got insurance. You’re smashing this for no reason.”

The Metropolitan Police said it is “aware of footage circulating on social media of an incident involving two uniformed officers in Camden”, adding that the incident took place at Weedington Road, north-west London, at around 5pm on Friday. In a statement, the Met said: “The footage will now be subject to an investigation by officers from the Directorate of Professional Standards (DPS).”

The policeman can be seen striking the windscreen, resulting in the glass shattering, and he then starts slicing around the damaged area with what appears to be a pen knife.

When asked by the driver what the problem is, the officer tells him he is “not allowed to drive”. The police force said on Saturday evening: “As soon as the MPS was made aware of the footage, the DPS was contacted immediately. The individual who uploaded the footage has been contacted by DPS officers.

“As this matter is in its early stages, the officers have not been suspended or placed on restricted duties. No-one was arrested during the incident.”

The video, which could not be independently verified, has been shared on Twitter and Instagram where the officer’s actions have been described as “mindless vandalism and intimidation”. A man who wanted to be referred to by just his first name, Leon, told the Press Association he was the driver and the person who filmed the footage.

He said the incident took place on Friday evening in the Gospel Oak area of north London, and said it was a case of “mistaken identity”, describing the officer’s actions as “a completely unlawful act”.

Leon, who said he spent the evening in hospital due to getting glass in his eyes, said it was “complete madness” and that he is “still in shock”.

“Every time he smashed the glass, fragments of glass were just ricocheting in my face,” he said.

Jumper EZpad 5S – TechRadar

Microsoft’s Surface 3 was, at least in the subdued PC market, a relative success, selling well despite a rather steep price point for what it provides hardware-wise (something we criticised1). At nearly 500 (£690 in the US, which is around AU£920) when you factor in the detachable keyboard and the stylus, it comes across as an expensive tablet even by Microsoft’s standards, especially as the competition has heated up in the 2-in-1 segment. So it comes as no surprise that, just like the MacBook Pro2 and the Yoga 3 (both of which had very similar competitors in the shape of the Xiaomi Air 123 and the Voyo VBook V34), the Surface 3 has attracted the attention of one Chinese vendor, Jumper.

The latter has unleashed the EZpad 5S, a Windows tablet with a detachable keyboard which is remarkably similar to the Surface 3.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

Gearbest sent us a review unit the device5 is currently on sale for just under 185 (£238, which is around AU£320) with the keyboard. Oddly, the model we received doesn’t look like the one that’s displayed on Gearbest’s product page the card reader is located on the side rather than under the kickstand, and there’s one microUSB port in lieu of a full-size USB 2.0. We strongly advise you to read our article on the pros and cons of buying from Chinese retailers6 (and generally speaking, outside of the UK).

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The Jumper EZpad 5S comes with the detachable keyboard, standard charger, a USB cable, and surprise, surprise, a stylus. Funnily enough, there’s no mention of the latter on the product page and it didn’t work when we tried it. You don’t need yet another charger as you can charge this tablet from pretty much any existing USB-equipped device and charger; and yes, that even includes portable battery packs.

The biggest difference between this slate and Microsoft’s effort is the aspect ratio of the display. To put it simply, the EZpad 5S looks like a stretched Surface 3, but other than this the differences between the two are relatively small.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The rather thick black bezel is there with the silver border and the slightly tapered edges. The physical Windows home button has been moved but the metal kickstand which locks in two positions (about 40- and 85-degrees) is present. The tablet’s enclosure is entirely made of brushed aluminium; Jumper says that it is as strong as stainless steel but a third lighter. From afar though, it looks like plastic painted to resemble, well, brushed aluminium.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The glass display is glossy and as expected, is a major fingerprint magnet, but that’s an endemic problem for (most) entry-level tablets in general. Microsoft used an Atom x7-Z8700 CPU for the Surface 3; Jumper opted for a much slower (and cheaper) x3-Z8300 processor instead.

The main differences between the two are the base frequencies (1.44GHz vs 1.6GHz), the burst frequencies (1.84GHz vs 2.4GHz) and the graphics units’ burst frequencies (500MHz vs 600MHz). Open the device up and you will see 4GB of RAM and 64GB on-board storage (eMMC) plus a large 8500mAh battery.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The EZpad 5S has a larger 11.6-inch display compared to Surface 3’s 10.8-inch screen, which translates into a lower pixel density, but that won’t mean much if you plan to use it mostly with a keyboard. The rest of the specification includes rear and front cameras (5MP and full HD respectively), Bluetooth 4.0 and 802.11n Wi-Fi, and on both sides, a mini-HDMI port, a pair of speakers, a headphone jack, an SD card slot, one USB 2.0 port, one USB 3.0 port and a microUSB one.

The power button and volume rocker can be found on the top, while the magnetic connector for the keyboard is located at the opposite end.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The keyboard cover adds some significant thickness to the keyboard but is a welcome addition. The tablet measures 276 x 172 x 8mm and weighs 676g, and the keyboard increases the overall weight by another 50%, to just over 1kg. Despite being a passive keyboard, it worked quite well, and is probably the best keyboard typing experience we’ve had on a cover-type model from any vendor and that includes the likes of Microsoft. Sure, it is a tad small and should ideally have taken the whole width of the cover, but it has a decent size touchpad, and the fact that it is rather thick (9mm) means there is at least some travel and spring.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

Don’t expect miracles though the keys are tiny so will require some adjustment for touch typing, especially as there’s barely any space between them. Fat-fingered typists will probably have a worse typing experience, predictably enough. The touchpad is smaller than a credit card but produces a useful click when pressed harder, and it’s precise.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

The IPS display, although sharp, lacked the punch usually associated with brighter monitors. We also noted that blacks were lacking and that wasn’t helped by the glare caused by the glass overlay, which added what looks like a layer of smog, even when we pushed the brightness setting to 100%. Having a metal body is useful to dissipate heat as the EZpad 5S doesn’t have an active fan, but it still got fairly hot in our tests. General performance was, as expected, significantly worse than most of the products we test here.

And the main culprits are the processor and the storage subsystem. We tested the Jumper tablet with Passmark, CPU-Z, GeekBench and Cinebench; unfortunately, CrystalDiskMark wouldn’t run. You can see the results below.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

We didn’t extensively test its battery life but we managed to play a YouTube video for about 3 hours 5 minutes on maximum brightness bear in mind that the battery saving mode kicked in on 20% battery life. That’s a decent result but a far cry from the Surface 3. You won’t buy the EZpad for its audio performance; the pair of speakers on this tablet is one of the worst we’ve encountered. The rendition of Alicia Keys phenomenal New York was appalling to say the least. All the ingredients for even an average audio experience were missing: there was barely any depth, a lack of definition, and muddled sound at higher frequencies. You could easily mistake this cacophony for the sound coming out of a pair of cheap smartphone earbuds.

Jumper EZpad 5S - TechRadar

And as with most of the Chinese devices we’ve tested up until now, the Windows 10 operating system has already been pre-registered, and ours even came with a Chinese version of WinRAR.

Early verdict

The Jumper EZpad is a better-than-average product with not much to be criticised concerning its performance or build. Sure, the battery life is poor and the speakers are terrible, but that’s about all on the moaning front. However, as with most products that ship directly from China, we have more than a few reservations, such as the OS installation and, as we mentioned before, be sure to check out our guide7 to online Chinese retailers. The truth of the matter is, though, that the competition outside the Surface 3 is, well, almost non-existent. The Acer Aspire Switch 11 V8 may have a much faster CPU but it also costs around twice the price. Ditto for the HP Pavilion x29 which is actually even more expensive (while having a better CPU and quadruple the storage).

As such the EZpad 5S almost wins by default sadly, none of the big players (Dell, Lenovo and HP) have anything even remotely competitive.

References

  1. ^ something we criticised (www.techradar.com)
  2. ^ MacBook Pro (www.techradar.com)
  3. ^ Xiaomi Air 12 (www.techradar.com)
  4. ^ Voyo VBook V3 (www.techradar.com)
  5. ^ device (www.gearbest.com)
  6. ^ pros and cons of buying from Chinese retailers (www.techradar.com)
  7. ^ guide (www.techradar.com)
  8. ^ Aspire Switch 11 V (www.techradar.com)
  9. ^ HP Pavilion x2 (www.techradar.com)

Matt Berry – The Small Hours

Like a British James Franco sporting a well shampooed badger on his face, Matt Berry operates on another level to us mere mortals. The foghorn-voiced Renaissance man s talents are capable of skipping across the screen, onto the stage, behind the pen and into a Volvic water bottle with ease; all while he campaigns ceaselessly as an ambassador for refugees, the multi-faceted cad. In addition to mastering the Rik Mayall school of acting through a run of brash, over-sexualised alpha male figures on British television, Berry has also found time to release a string of experimental prog-folk records that started with 2008 s Opium . The keen multi-instrumentalist can commonly be found recording every note of his musical output and often teaches himself new instruments from scratch in a matter of weeks. He may not look it, but Matt Berry is pretty much a modern Da Vinci, just with better hair and without the propensity for sketching weapons of mass destruction in his notepad margins. What we’re trying to say through all this awestruck gushing is that, if this article was a review of Matt Berry as a man, a leader of men and a passionate lover (or so I nightly imagine), he d get 10/10 every time. But, as those of you who ve cheated and scrolled down to the bottom of this page to see the score will know, this polemic sadly ends here.

Like its predecessor Music For Insomniacs , The Small Hours purports to have been drawn from that surrealistic period between midnight and dawn when the frayed edges of dreams seem to weave themselves into strands of inspiration. But while the luscious Insomniacs channelled Brian Eno at his most inspired, Hours channels Dave Gilmour at his sleepiest. This instinctive, stream-of-consciousness writing results in some pleasant melodies on tracks such as Beam Me Up and Say It Again . Overall, however, this exercise in easy listening is about the most dad-friendly thing Berry s done since that BBC Father s Day special. Opener One By One amounts to little more than the kind of straightforward acoustic rock ballad that could be churned out by any number of greying pub-bound bands scattered about the country, while elsewhere Gone For Good sounds like it could have been the result of David Gray s reggae phase in some horrifically dystopian parallel universe. Maybe it s just be the fact that Berry has been writing with his live band in the studio for the first time and has had to streamline his usually ambitious writing process; but the spark of unpredictability that defined his previous records is sadly lacking. For the first time in his musical career Matt Berry sounds like an aging comedian living out his rock n roll fantasies. I don t want to whack out a lazy Ricky Gervais comparison (they both starred in seminal ’00s BBC comedies! They both played hapless bosses stuck with outdated values! etc.), but there are shades of Life On The Road audible here that simply cannot be denied. That would be fine if his music was a similar extension of his comic persona, but there s no Brent-like goatee and nod to the camera for Berry to hide behind here. When moonlighting as a musician he has always been careful to drop his signature onscreen hamminess and affected gruff roar in exchange for a stripped back vulnerability. So when you hear him sincerely uttering lines like The peach said to her sister Oi there melon! This is heaven, on the godawful The Peach and the Melon , your toes can t help but curl up faster than a frightened hedgehog.

Most of these issues are confined to the safer first half of the album. Things improve drastically towards its back end when the instrumental jazzathon Night Terrors rocks up to the party with a lopsided grin and a picnic hamper of hard drugs. Like his past albums bloated highlights The Pheasant and Solstice , this winding nine minute-er demonstrates that Berry is at his best when he goes wildly off script. The similarly late in the day single Obsessed And So Obscure is instantly familiar in the best of ways, despite some bizarre lyrics about lusting after Christopher Lee (to reiterate, this is not a comedy album).

Still, despite this late-album salvaging, The Small Hours marks the first Matt Berry album that might merit a little stick to the day job heckling from its audience. With any luck this constitutes no more than a blip, a small blemish on the well-groomed polymath s sterling and varied career that will be overshadowed by his future endeavours. As it stands, though, this is a record that should only be bought if you feel like another pair of socks might just drive your dad to do something drastic this Christmas.

5/10

Words: Josh Gray

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References

  1. ^ Buy Clash Magazine (www.clashmusic.com)

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