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Apple iPhone 6 – CNET

Editors’ note: On September 7, 2016, Apple debuted the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus, and discontinued the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus. The iPhone 6S and 6S Plus remain available, however, and Apple has increased the storage capacity of the entry-level models to 32GB and lowered their prices to £549 and £649, respectively. The full iPhone 6 review, first published in September 2014, updated to include a CNET Editor’s Choice designation in November 2014, and then updated in Summer 2015, follows.12345

In 2014, Apple forked its iPhone product line, simultaneously introducing the next generation of its flagship model — the iPhone 6 — and debuting its super-sized sibling, the iPhone 6 Plus6. The iPhone 67 is an exceptional phone in nearly every way but for its middling battery life. The iPhone 6 Plus8 is also impressive; larger and thinner than other iPhone models, and with the capacity for far more endurance on a single charge than most comparably-sized and smaller competitors. When choosing between the 6 and 6 Plus, in the end, it’s a matter of personal preference. I know several people who love the iPhone 6 Plus, with its larger screen size and better battery life. But the iPhone 6 feels best in my hand. It’s thin, elegant, performs really well, and is considerably less expensive than the 6 Plus. For that reason, I think the smaller iPhone 6 is the way to go for most people.

Design

The iPhone 6’s thin, all-metal aesthetic makes for one of the sleekest designs in the smartphone universe. This iPhone is only slightly thinner than the previous model but feels more so; this is due to the increased screen size and curved design. Glass from the front folds ever so slightly around the edges — a departure from the sharp industrial edges of the iPhone 5 and 5S. It also feels a little like the original iPhone9 , which had a rounded design. But that phone was chunkier, with a far smaller screen. It felt like holding a pebble. The iPhone 6 is flat and thin, like a slab.

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET CNET

The iPhone 6 feels good to hold, beautifully solid, with a smooth, metal back and glass front. But it has an aura of fragility — maybe it’s the extra-slim look, or the massive pane of curved glass on the front. I instantly wanted to slip it into a case just to be safe. Early reports of bending iPhones10 may have been overblown11. Consumer Reports’ testing12 found that the new iPhones can withstand less pressure13 than the iPhone 5, LG G314 and Samsung Galaxy Note 315 , but are about as equally durable as the HTC One16 M8. In other words, it’s not exactly delicate, but, like any other phone, it can be damaged — so handle with care, and get a case for it17. The camera lens on the back of the iPhone 6 protrudes slightly, which made me worry about setting the phone down on rough surfaces, despite the fortitude of the sapphire lens. Again: using a case will alleviate any concerns.

The volume buttons, which were round and raised on previous iPhones, are elongated on the 6, similar to those on the iPod Touch and iPad18. The power/sleep button has shifted to the right, making it easier to find in my experience.

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

CNET

A round Touch ID home button is located underneath the display; a simple press on the fingerprint reader unlocks the phone, and works amazingly well most of the time. While this feature is no longer as novel as it was when it debuted, Touch ID remains quicker and more reliable than the fingerprint detection capabilities we’ve seen on other smartphones. And with iOS 8, you can use fingerprint access for a wide variety of apps beyond the lock screen and iTunes Store.

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

The 2013 Moto X (left), iPhone 6 (center), Nexus 5 (right). See what I mean? CNET

If I have one problem with the new design, it’s the bezel around the display. It’s still big — bigger than that of most Android phones, which means that the iPhone 6, with its 4.7-inch screen, is the same size as other phones with 5-inch screens. For example, the iPhone 6 runs as tall and wide the Nexus 519 , which has a larger 5-inch screen; it’s also larger than the 2013 Moto X, which fits a comparable 4.7-inch display into a more compact body. (Both the old Moto X and Nexus 5 are thicker, however.) The iPhone 6 measures 5.4 by 2.6 inches, and 0.3 inch thick (138 by 67 by 69mm). It weighs 4.5 ounces, or 128 grams.

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

CNET

Though the iPhone 6 is basically one-hand friendly (and certainly more so than the iPhone 6 Plus), it comes with a useful but weird software feature called Reachability20 that pulls the top half of the display down to midscreen with a light double-tap of the Home button, for easier thumb access.

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

Sarah Tew/CNET

The screen

iPhones have always had phenomenal displays, both in terms of brightness and color quality. In CNET’s battery of tests21, we found that the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus’s screens are even better than those on previous iPhones, with superior grayscale and contrast levels. Though phones with OLED displays22, like the Samsung Galaxy S523 , deliver more vivid contrast and slightly richer, if less accurate, color, the iPhone 6’s 4.7-inch IPS display24 is excellent: vivid and rich. The display’s 1,344×750-pixel resolution is higher than the fifth generation’s 1,136×640, but it has the same 326ppi pixel density25. It’s a good step up. A grid of six-by-four apps now fits on each page plus the four in the dock below, for 28 total; on the 5’s 4-inch display, it’s 24. There are more pixels horizontally and vertically, unlike the merely vertical lengthening of the iPhone 5. That also means the aspect ratio is the same (16×9), and videos and Web pages scale similarly.

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

A handy comparison of all iOS screen sizes: 4S, 5S, 6, 6 Plus, iPad Mini, iPad Air. CNET

Native apps look fantastic and nonoptimized apps scale up well, too: games and streaming video services designed for a smaller display still fill the screen and have crisp text. I still think many people will find this 4.7-inch screen to find the right balance between functionality and portability. That noted, the iPhone 6’s screen resolution is a step below ideal.

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

Apple IPhone 6 - CNET

CNET

Performance: Faster still

The iPhone 6 is among the fastest phones around. It comes equipped with the A8 64-bit dual-core processor, which Apple claims delivers a 25 percent boost in speed and a 50 percent graphics boost over the iPhone 5S; this claim was confirmed in both our benchmark tests (see below) and hands-on testing. Navigating the UI and launching apps is zippy, and the phone runs nearly all tasks at a silky-smooth clip.

Apple’s Metal coding tool26 helps some iOS games perform even better than the benchmarks suggest. Games that have been iPhone 6-optimized look great and load and run quickly, but the difference isn’t as dramatic as you might expect. (Read about Apple’s Metal-related announcements from its Worldwide Developers Conference27 in June 2015.)

3DMark Ice Storm — Unlimited

Apple iPhone 5S

Apple iPhone 6

Apple iPhone 6 Plus

Motorola Moto X (2014)

Samsung Galaxy S5

HTC One M8

Note:

In frames per second; longer bars indicate better performance

Geekbench 3

HTC One M8

Apple iPhone 5S

Apple iPhone 6 Plus

Apple iPhone 6

Samsung Galaxy S5

Motorola Moto X (2014)

Legend:

Single-core (Blue)

Multi-core (Red)

Note:

In frames per second; longer bars indicate better performance

Linpack multithread

Motorola Moto X (2014)

HTC One M8

Samsung Galaxy S5

Apple iPhone 5S

Apple iPhone 6 Plus

Apple iPhone 6

Note:

In MFLOPS; longer bars indicate better performance

SunSpider 1.0.2

Motorola Moto X (2014)

Samsung Galaxy S5

HTC One M8

Apple iPhone 5S

Apple iPhone 6 Plus

Apple iPhone 6

Note:

In milliseconds; shorter bars indicate better performance

References

  1. ^ iPhone 7 (www.cnet.com)
  2. ^ iPhone 7 Plus (www.cnet.com)
  3. ^ 6 Plus (www.cnet.com)
  4. ^ iPhone 6S (www.cnet.com)
  5. ^ 6S Plus (www.cnet.com)
  6. ^ iPhone 6 Plus (www.cnet.com)
  7. ^ iPhone 6 (www.cnet.com)
  8. ^ iPhone 6 Plus (www.cnet.com)
  9. ^ original iPhone (www.cnet.com)
  10. ^ bending iPhones (www.cnet.com)
  11. ^ may have been overblown (www.cnet.com)
  12. ^ Consumer Reports’ testing (www.consumerreports.org)
  13. ^ withstand less pressure (www.cnet.com)
  14. ^ LG G3 (www.cnet.com)
  15. ^ Samsung Galaxy Note 3 (www.cnet.com)
  16. ^ HTC One (www.cnet.com)
  17. ^ get a case for it (www.cnet.com)
  18. ^ iPad (www.cnet.com)
  19. ^ Nexus 5 (www.cnet.com)
  20. ^ Reachability (www.cnet.com)
  21. ^ CNET’s battery of tests (www.cnet.com)
  22. ^ OLED displays (www.cnet.com)
  23. ^ Samsung Galaxy S5 (www.cnet.com)
  24. ^ IPS display (www.cnet.com)
  25. ^ pixel density (www.cnet.com)
  26. ^ Metal coding tool (www.cnet.com)
  27. ^ Metal-related announcements from its Worldwide Developers Conference (www.cnet.com)

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB vs 6GB review

The 3GB version of Nvidia’s GTX 1060 is a curious product. Is it actually a GTX 1060 at all? The cutbacks made to this product aren’t just memory-based in nature. In addition to chopping down the full-fat product’s memory allocation, we also see a drop in available processing cores. The full complement of 1280 shaders drops to 1152 – and most of the time, this tends to be accompanied by a change in name. GTX 1050 Ti, any one? GTX 1060 LE? It seems that Nvidia is using its product names now to group its GPUs together in terms of performance as opposed to actual spec. Based on the firm’s claims, the three gig GTX 1060 should offer just a five per cent deficit in performance compared to the same product running the fully enabled GP106 processor. Essentially – in practise, you probably won’t be able to tell the difference. But it’s the drop in available memory we should be most concerned about. High quality texture modes are on the increase, downloadable ‘HQ’ texture packs are also a thing, not to mention the beginnings of memory hungry hyper-level presets – as seen in Mirror’s Edge Catalyst. Now, generally speaking, based on our experience playing the likes of Gears of War Ultimate Edition, Mirror’s Edge, Rise of the Tomb Raider and Doom 2016, the difference can be quite subtle. But the point is that generally speaking, memory requirements are only moving in one direction and there’s a definite sense that even with its cut-back shader allocation, GTX 1060 3GB doesn’t fully balance its performance with its framebuffer resources.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB specs

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB Vs 6GB Review

What we’re looking at here is the exact same technology as the full-fat GTX 1060, with a couple of cut-backs – there’s 90 per cent of the full CUDA core count, and obviously the framebuffer memory is halved.

  • CUDA Cores: 1152
  • Base Clock: 1506MHz (1594MHz on MSI model)
  • Boost Clock: 1708MHz (1796MHz on MSI model)
  • Texture Units: 72
  • Memory Clock: 8GHz
  • Memory Bandwidth: 192GB/s
  • ROPs: 48
  • L2 Cache Size: 1536KB
  • Transistors: 4.4 billion
  • Die Size: 200mm2
  • Process: 16nm FinFet
  • Connectors: 3x DisplayPort, 1x HDMI 2.0, 1x Dual-Link DVI
  • Power Connector: 1x 6-pin (1x 8-pin on MSI model)
  • TDP: 120W

The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 in its 6GB guise starts at 240/£250, while the cut-back model sees a 50/£50 reduction, starting at 190/£199. But there are mitigating factors here. The GTX 1060 3GB is only a touch more expensive than AMD’s RX 470 and the performance advantage Nvidia offers is undeniable in most titles. It’s £60 cheaper than the fully enabled 6GB model, and even the UK price is reasonable at 180. And then there’s the fact that Nvidia’s memory compression is good. It’s really good. It’s demonstrably more efficient than AMD’s, to the point where comparisons between the three gig GTX 1060 and the four gig RX 470 should prove fascinating. embedded content

Rich presents a video review of the GTX 1060 in its 3GB guise, stacked up against the fully-enabled 6GB version – plus the AMD competition.

While there have been compromises to bring the price down, it’s important to note that while some elements of the GTX 1060 3GB spec have been pared back, other aspects remain fully intact. Base clocks and boost clocks are exactly the same, for example. In fact, there is no Founders Edition this time – no reference board, in effect – so most of the GTX 1060s out there will have a factory overclock of some description. The MSI Gaming X card we were sent for review actually has a meaty 88MHz boost to the core clock and a somewhat less significant 40MHz added to the GDDR5 RAM. The memory base spec also remains unchanged from the six gig GTX 1060 – we’re looking at a 192-bit memory bus running 8gbps memory for a final memory bandwidth tally of 192GB/s. Testing here is split into our usual resolution breakdowns – and for a card of this class, we’re looking at 1080p and 1440p resolutions. Our aim here is to confirm GTX 1060 3GB’s relationship performance-wise to its bigger brother, and also to stack up the card against AMD’s four gig RX 480 and RX 470 (note: our data here comes from an MSI factory overclocked model). And finally, we really need to get to the bottom of the VRAM situation – to stack up Pascal’s enviable memory compression and Nvidia’s driver memory management against the ‘luxury’ of an addition gigabyte of VRAM found in the RX products. As a sub- 200 graphics card, the new GTX 1060 is clearly aimed at those gaming at 1080p resolution – by far the most popular type of display. And that’s where we’ll begin with our benchmarks. There are few surprises here – the GTX 1060, overall, is a best in class performer, winning seven of the eight benchmarks against AMD products in the same price bracket.

embedded content

The GTX 1060 in three gig form takes on RX 470 and RX 480, plus its six gig sibling in our video benchmarks above.

1920×1080 (1080p) GTX 1060 3GB MSI GTX 1060 3GB GTX 1060 6GB GTX 970 4GB MSI RX 470 4GB RX 480 4GB RX 480 8GB Assassin’s Creed Unity, Ultra High, FXAA 55.2 57.0 58.2 51.3 48.8 50.4 50.8 Ashes of the Singularity, Extreme, 0x MSAA, DX12 46.8 46.6 45.9 40.5 45.2 45.9 47.7 Crysis 3, Very High, SMAA T2x 74.8 77.2 78.7 72.5 68.0 68.8 70.1 The Division, Ultra, SMAA 54.3 55.5 56.6 50.2 51.3 53.6 54.8 Far Cry Primal, Ultra, SMAA 63.1 64.7 65.6 56.2 54.7 57.1 58.7 Hitman, Ultra, SMAA, DX12 57.7 59.7 65.8 59.0 68.6 71.4 73.2 Rise of the Tomb Raider, Very High, High Textures, SMAA, DX12 74.2 74.3 75.1 69.7 64.1 65.4 66.0 The Witcher 3, Ultra, Post AA, No HairWorks 64.7 66.5 68.4 60.7 57.9 60.5 61.2

The numbers are confirmed. By running the MSI Gaming card in its silent mode, the GTX 1060 3GB we have here matches the reference clocks – with boost topping out just below 1.9GHz, just like its bigger brother. However, a 10 per cent deficit in CUDA cores does indeed translate to the five per cent drop in performance stated by Nvidia. This delta is mitigated somewhat by the factory overclock found in our MSI model, which generally sits as a mid-point between reference GTX 1060 3GB and 6GB models. In almost all cases, the budget Nvidia offering outperforms the RX 470 (and remember, this will be boosted by a couple of frames owing to its factory OC) along with both iterations of the RX 480. Even Ashes of the Singularity – a weak point for Nvidia – sees it offer basic parity across the run of the clip. In all of the benches here, there is no evidence to suggest that the 3GB framebuffer causes issues – except in one title, Hitman. Here, the performance drop-off on GTX 1060 3GB is significant – and we strongly suspect that DX12, where the developer takes over memory management duties, sees the card hit its VRAM limit. Notably, this does not happen on the AMD cards with four gigs of memory. Hitman is also notable in that it is the only benchmark where we see the GTX 970 pull ahead of the GTX 1060, if only by a small margin. However, again, VRAM is the likely culprit – in terms of processing power, GTX 1060 3GB is clearly ahead of GTX 970, so by a process of elimination, the three gigabyte limit on the new card is the limiting factor.

embedded content

Both GTX 1060s are good to go for 1440p gameplay, but careful settings tweaks are essential – especially when it comes to texture levels on the three gig model.

2560×1440 (1440p) GTX 1060 3GB MSI GTX 1060 3GB GTX 1060 6GB GTX 970 4GB MSI RX 470 4GB RX 480 4GB RX 480 8GB Assassin’s Creed Unity, Ultra High, FXAA 32.4 33.5 37.4 32.7 29.6 31.0 33.8 Ashes of the Singularity, Extreme, 0x MSAA, DX12 41.3 41.6 41.2 35.9 40.1 40.7 42.7 Crysis 3, Very High, SMAA T2x 45.6 47.4 47.7 43.8 41.3 41.8 43.1 The Division, Ultra, SMAA 37.7 38.9 39.9 36.1 37.2 38.1 39.0 Far Cry Primal, Ultra, SMAA 42.7 43.9 45.0 39.6 39.2 40.7 42.3 Hitman, Ultra, SMAA, DX12 41.0 42.1 48.1 41.5 50.0 52.2 55.0 Rise of the Tomb Raider, Very High, High Textures, SMAA, DX12 47.8 47.8 49.2 46.1 43.2 45.0 45.8 The Witcher 3, Ultra, Post AA, No HairWorks 45.4 46.9 48.2 31.9 41.9 43.5 45.3

At 2560×1440, the numbers tend to close up when the lower-end GTX 1060 is stacked up against the AMD competition – and the five per cent delta in performance against the full-fat model remains in effect. In addition to the noticeable deficit that remains in Hitman, there is a clear deviation in the data for Assassin’s Creed Unity and Hitman, showing that we are hitting VRAM limits. This is confirmed by the memory utilisation when monitored using MSI Afterburner, but more telling are the frame-times, which sees regular latency spikes – a classic sign of VRAM over-commitment. It’s interesting to note that the GTX 970 hands in the same average frame-rate overall, but has none of the spikes – once again it suggests that the additional memory demonstrably helps here. Titles like Crysis 3, The Division and The Witcher 3 amongst others clearly show that there is no degradation in performance when VRAM is managed well. However, the higher you scale native rendering resolution, the more desirable higher quality textures become. From a processor performance perspective, clearly the cut-down GP106 chip has the power to run 1440p gaming – but memory is clearly much more of an issue here; we need to house the same texture data as we do at 1080p, but the render targets internally generated to create the final scene increase in size by up to 77 per cent. Pascal’s excellent memory compression here can only go so far and its effectiveness will vary on a scene-by-scene nature.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB Vs 6GB Review

Very high textures are not recommended for cards with 4GB and under, but we decided to test it any way. Here you’re seeing a stress point where the four gig AMD card sustains performance, while the three gig 1060 stutters, then tanks. By and large, the three gig GTX 1060 copes with our benchmarks well, but a closer look at the VRAM problem titles – Hitman and Assassin’s Creed Unity – show something interesting. Stutter isn’t a major issue as we thought it might be (as data shuttles to and from system RAM to VRAM) but instead we see a general depression in performance. So in Unity for example, the expected five per cent delta between the 3GB and 6GB GTX 1060s increases to 15 per cent at 1440p. The 4GB AMD cards exhibit more stutter, but still operate roughly at their expected performance level. This begs the question – can a 3GB Nvidia card match or beat a 4GB AMD product? The AC Unity data suggests so, but our next test – designed to heavily over-commit VRAM – demonstrates that having that additional gigabyte of VRAM certainly helps the Radeon products. We re-ran our Rise of the Tomb Raider benchmark at 1080p with the very high textures engaged – something the developer warns against specifically. There are three sections to this bench: in the first, the three gig GTX 1060 keeps up with its more expensive sibling, but as we move into the second and third areas, we hit a short period of stutter followed by sustained, lower frame-rates.

And what we find here is that the RX 470 – demonstrably the weaker card when VRAM is not being tested – actually moves into the lead during the majority of the bench, and it seems that it’s just about capable of housing the required texture data without dropping performance. Of course, it’s just a limited set of data on a test that the developers specifically recommends we don’t run. But the point is that we can demonstrate that there are some applications where four gigs at 1080p is indeed better than three – even factoring in Nvidia’s superior memory compression technology. embedded content

It’s a GTX 1060 face-off at 1080p and 1440p – here you can see the impact of the VRAM and shader differentials between the two cards in one video. Bearing in mind that the GTX 1060 3GB supplied by MSI already has an 88MHz factory overclock in place, hopes weren’t high that we could push this card much further. After all, it boosts to 2GHz out of the box (!) when set to OC mode. However, we were wrong. Pushing up power to max and adding 190MHz to the core, we could hit a remarkable 2.19GHz – rock-solid on our Crysis 3 stress-test, but buckling as soon as we hit 2.2GHz. These are the highest core clocks we’ve ever seen from any Pascal chip, but unfortunately our surprise was short-lived – Ashes of the Singularity wasn’t stable at all, and we had to drop down to 140MHz. However, this is still on top of the factory OC and a remarkable result overall. The GDDR5 RAM handled a +450MHz offset, bringing up up to 8.9GHz effective. Again, that’s not bad.

Re-benching a few titles, the impact of the overclock becomes clear – we’re looking at a 12 per cent increase in performance over the GTX 1060’s stock configuration, dropping to eight per cent when compared to the factory OC we have with the MSI Gaming X’s set-up. This isn’t exactly a revelatory increase overall – the days of 20 per cent overclocks with the last-gen 900-series Maxwell cards are clearly over. However, it is enough to push the cut-down GP106 clear of the fully enabled version when we’re not limited by VRAM.

Power consumption from Pascal continues to be highly impressive. Perhaps not surprisingly, the MSI card – with its custom PCB and factory overclock – managed to consume a touch more power than the standard Founders Edition 6GB version, but we’re still looking at an extremely creditable result overall at 234W. What’s remarkable here are the thermals. Even when we had the MSI model running at 2.19GHz, the core hit a maximum of just 67 degrees Celsius. This is way, way better than the six gig Founders Edition we have and based on our much better overclock and lower temps, we reckon that the six gig MSI version could be rather impressive.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB Vs 6GB Review

This scene from Crysis 3 is easily repeatable and incurs a heavy, sustained load on the GPU – good for testing overclocks and peak power draw.

GTX 1060 3GB GTX 1060 3GB OC GTX 1060 6GB GTX 970 MSI RX 470 RX 480 Peak System Power Draw 234W 250W 230W 295W 283W 271W

Locarno Film Review: ‘Scarred Hearts’

Radu Jude1 keeps his actors and his audience at arm s length with Scarred Hearts2, a strangely distancing drama set in the 1930s that s loosely based on the writings of Romanian author Max Blecher. Unlike Jude s award winning Aferim, which pulled viewers into its scabrous 19th-century world, here the director (collaborating again with DP Marius Panduru) primarily uses master shots, allowing the action to passively pass before the camera. Given that the protagonist and his friends are mostly lying on hospital beds in partial body casts, the static lensing (and 1:1.85 aspect ratio) does have a formal function, yet its effect is misjudged. Jude s name assures a few festival bookings, though Scarred Hearts won t duplicate the traction of his previous film.

Both Aferim and Scarred Hearts presume a certain amount of historical knowledge, but where the former s narrative drive was strong enough to minimize concerns over possible information gaps, the latter s unannotated immersion coupled with its episodic structure suggests the film won t have the same pull. Yes, the evocation of torture-like medical techniques of the era has a certain unnerving fascination, and Emanuel (Lucian Rus), the Max Blecher stand-in, is a deeply sympathetic fellow, but the frequent quotations from Blecher s works, edited in like intertitles on a black screen, keep interrupting potential involvement.

Emanuel suffers from Pott s disease, a form of tuberculosis of the spine, so in 1934 his father (Alexandru Dabija) takes him to a seaside hospital/sanitarium run by officious chain-smoking Dr. Ceafalan ( erban Pavlu). There his torso is put in a cast, an abscess is painfully drained, and he spends the ensuing years with fellow patients, nurses and visitors in a necessarily compromised attempt to realize some sort of social life. Self-assured former patient Solange (Serbian director Ivana Mladenovi ) makes him feel semi-normal, while Isa (Ilinca Harnut) in a nearby hospital room adds a welcome note of irony as well as being a model of resigned perseverance.

The film is not meant to be a biography of Blecher but rather is loosely inspired by the writer s works: Scarred Hearts is the title of Blecher s autobiographical novel about patients in a hospital in Berck-sur-Mer, France, though the film is equally indebted to his posthumously published The Enlightened Lair. Given the author s straitened physical circumstances, he wrote an extraordinary amount and is considered one of Romania s key intellects from between the wars, but it s not clear if Jude means for his Emanuel to also be an author, since he s never seen with pen in hand. Passages from Blecher s books are flashed on screen, often dealing with the unimportance of human existence, featuring lines like futility filled the world like oozing liquid, yet they convey a one-note sense of the writer s world view (how many viewers will register that he s reading Kierkegaard?).

Events of the time are referenced, especially the rise of the fascist, anti-Semitic Iron Guard, with casual mention of such key supporters as philosophers Emil Cioran and Nae Ionescu, yet few outside Romania will recognize the names, further minimizing the chances for Scarred Hearts to play abroad apart from scattered fests and contextualized Romanian showcases. In addition, scenes of patients and nurses fraternizing, getting drunk, brawling, and playing spin-the-bottle are so drawn out that they benumb audience concentration, making philosophical discussions sound like meaningless blather.

Emanuel s likeability (more apparent in the film than in Blecher s novel) unquestionably helps bridge the extended running time, and Solange is a fascinating character, liberated yet still drawn to the scene of her hospitalization. The film also has a sense of humor Emanuel and Isa attempting sex with semi-body casts deservedly gets several guffaws but the project never quite comes together. Much of the fault lies in the visual conception, with its largely static camera, which moves basically only when Emanuel is wheeled about on his hospital bed or gurney. Otherwise, master shots held at a fixed distance constantly thwart attempts to get into the story, making for empty formal appreciation with little compensating emotion. Shooting was done on 35mm.

Related stories

Locarno Film Review: ‘The Ornithologist’3

Locarno Film Review: ‘Heaven Will Wait’4

Locarno: France’s Pierre Menahem Talks Sales, Festivals, Trusting One’s Own Taste5

Get more from Variety and Variety41167: Follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Newsletter8910

References

  1. ^ Radu Jude (variety.com)
  2. ^ Scarred Hearts (variety.com)
  3. ^ Locarno Film Review: ‘The Ornithologist’ (variety.com)
  4. ^ Locarno Film Review: ‘Heaven Will Wait’ (variety.com)
  5. ^ Locarno: France’s Pierre Menahem Talks Sales, Festivals, Trusting One’s Own Taste (variety.com)
  6. ^ Variety (variety.com)
  7. ^ Variety411 (variety411.com)
  8. ^ Twitter (bit.ly)
  9. ^ Facebook (on.fb.me)
  10. ^ Newsletter (bit.ly)

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